Réconciliation entre livre papier et numérique Etude Pew Research

Réconciliation entre livre papier et numérique Etude Pew Research

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NUMBERS, FACTS AND TRENDS SHAPING THE WORLD FOR RELEASE JANUARY 16, 2014 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON THIS REPORT: Kathryn Zickuhr, Research Associate, Pew Internet Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet 202.419.4500 www.pewresearch.org RECOMMENDED CITATION: Pew Research Center, January, 2014, “” E-Reading Rises as Device Ownership Jumps” ” Available at: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2014/E-Reading-Update.aspx 1 PEW RESEARCH CENTER Overview The proportion of Americans who read e- books is growing, but few have completely Most adults read a book in the past year; replaced print books for electronic print remains most popular, but e-reading is versions. on the rise Among American adults 18 and older, the % who read at least one book (in total, in print, or as an e-book) in the past year The percentage of adults who read an e- book in the past year has risen to 28%, up 2011 2012 2014 from 23% at the end of 2012. At the same 80 % time, about seven in ten Americans 79 70 76 74 71 69 reported reading a book in print, up four 60 65 50percentage points after a slight dip in 402012, and 14% of adults listened to an 30audiobook. 28 20 23 10 17 Though e-books are rising in popularity, 0 Total (any format) Read a print book Read an e-bookprint remains the foundation of Americans’ reading habits. Most people * “Total” also includes those who listen to audio books (not shown).

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FOR RELEASE JANUARY 16, 2014
NUMBERS, FACTS AND TRENDS SHAPING THE WORLD
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON THIS REPORT:
KathrynZickuhr ,ResearchAssociate ,PewInternetLeeRainie ,Director,PewInternet202.419.4500 www.pewresearch.org
RECOMMENDED CITATION: Pew Research Center, January, 2014, “”E-Reading Rises as Device Ownership Jumps” ”Available at:http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2014/E-Reading-Update.aspx
Overview
1 PEW RESEARCH CENTER
The proportion of Americans who read e-books is growing, but few have completely replaced print books for electronic versions. The percentage of adults who read an e-book in the past year has risen to 28%, up from 23% at the end of 2012. At the same time, about seven in ten Americans reported reading a book in print, up four percentage points after a slight dip in 2012, and 14% of adults listened to an audiobook. Though e-books are rising in popularity, print remains the foundation of Americans’ reading habits. Most people who read e-books also read print books, and just 4% of readers are “e-book only.Audiobook listeners have the most diverse reading habits overall, while fewer print readers consume books in other formats.
Most adults read a book in the past year; print remains most popular, but e-reading is on the rise mong American adults 18 and older, the % who read at least one book (in total, in print, or as an e-book) in the past year 2011 2012 2014 80 % 79 70 76 74 71 69 60 65 50 40 30 2028 23 10 17 0 Total (any format) Read a print book Read an e-book * “Total” also includes those who listen to audio books (not shown).Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet Project Omnibus Survey, January 2-5, 2014. N= 1005 American adults ages 18 and older. Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English and Spanish. PEW RESEARCH CENTER
Overall, 76% of adults read a book in some format over the previous 12 months. The typical American adult read or listened to 5 books in the past year, and the average for all adults was 12 1 books. Neither the mean nor median number of books read has changed significantly over the past few years.
1 In other words, the mean (average) number of books read or listened to in the past year was 12 and the median (midpoint) number was 5 (meaning that half of adults read more than 5 books and half read fewer. ) This mean can be skewed by a relatively small number of very avid readers, which is why the median is a better measure of what the “typical” American’s reading habits looklike.
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2 PEW RESEARCH CENTER
The January 2014 survey, conducted just after the 2013 holiday gift-giving season, produced evidence that e-book reading devices are spreading through the population. Some 42% of adults now own tablet computers, up from 34% in September. And the number of adults who own an e-book reading device like a Kindle or Nook reader jumped from 24% in September to 32% after the holidays.
Overall, 50% of Americans now have a dedicated handheld deviceeither a tablet computer like an iPad, or an e-reader such as a Kindle or Nookfor reading e-content. That figure has grown from 43% of adults who had either of those devices in September.
In addition, the survey found that 92% of adults have a cell phone (including the 55% of adults who have a smartphone), and 75% have a laptop or desktop computerfigures that have not changed in significantly from our pre-holiday surveys.
E-book readers who own tablets or e-readers are very likely to read e-books on those devicesbut those who own computers or cellphones sometimes turn to those platforms, too. And as tablet and e-reader ownership levels have risen over the past few years, these devices have become more prominent in the e-reading landscape:
Half of American adults now own either a tablet or an e-reader % of American adults ages 18+ who own each device 80% Have an e-reader Have a tablet 60% Have either tablet or e-reader 50% 42% 40%
20%
0% 2010
2011
2012
2013
32%
Source: PewResearch Center’s Internet Project Omnibus Survey, January 2-5, 2014. N= 1005 American adults ages 18 and older. Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English and Spanish. PEW RESEARCH CENTER
As tablet ownership grows, more use them for e-books mong all e-book readers ages 18 and older, the % who read e-books on each device
41
57
23
2011 2014
55
42
29
32 28
E-reader Tablet Computer Cell phone Source: Pew Research Center surveys, Dec 2011-January 2014. Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English and Spanish. PEW RESEARCH CENTER
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These findings come from a survey conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between January 2-5, 2013. The survey was conducted among a nationally representative sample of 1,005 adults ages 18 and older living in the continental United States. Interviews were conducted by landline (500) and cell phone (505, including 268 without a landline phone), and were done in English and Spanish. Statistical results are weighted to correct known demographic discrepancies. The margin of error for the full sample is plus or minus 3.4 percentage points.
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4 PEW RESEARCH CENTER
Half of American adults now own a tablet or e-reader
Over the 2013 holiday period, the rate of tablet ownership rose to 42% of American adults, up eight percentage points from September. Ownership of e-book reading devices like Kindles or Nooks similarly increased to 32% as of January 2014. Some 50% of adults now own at least one of 2 these devices.
blet ownership over time E-reader ownership over time % of American adults ages 18+ who own a tablet % of American adults ages 18+ who own an e-reader
3%
10% 8%
24%
42% 34%
32% 24% 19% 12% 10% 4%
May-10 May-11 Dec-11 Nov-12 Sep-13 Jan-14 May-10 May-11 Dec-11 Nov-12 Sep-13 Jan-14
Source: Pew Research Center surveys, May 2010-January 2014. Source: Pew Research Center surveys, May 2010-January 2014. Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English and Spanish. and Spanish. PEW RESEARCH CENTER PEW RESEARCH CENTER
E-reader owners are more likely to be white, between the ages of 30 and 64, and with at least some college experience. Those with tablet computers are more likely to be younger (under age 50), with higher levels of education and from relatively well-off householdsclose to two-thirds (65%) of people living in households earning $75,000 or more annually now own a tablet.
2 In other words, 50% of American adults own either a tablet or an e -reader, or both.
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5 PEW RESEARCH CENTER
Who owns tablets and e-readers? mong all American adults ages 18+, the % who own either a tablet computer or an e-reader
Tablet E-reader  otal(All adults 18+) 42% 32%  xaMale 42 29 bFemale 43 33 ityhnice/etRacbc a 35White 41 b 24Black 34 c 18Hispanic 45 ge groupd a 2818-29 48 cd ad b 4030-49 52 d d c 3250-64 37 d 2265+ 25 Education levela 29 22High school grad or less a a b 45Some college 33 ab ab cCollege graduate 59 44 Household incomea 14< $30,000 26 a a b 36$30,000-$49,999 45 a a c$50,000-$74,999 47 42 abc ab d 53$75,000+ 65 Community typeaUrban 43 32 bSuburban 43 32 cRural 38 29 Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet Project Omnibus Survey, January 2-5, 2014. N= 1005 American adults ages 18 and older. Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English and Spanish. PEW RESEARCH CENTER
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A Snapshot of Reading in America in 2013
As of January 2014, some 76% of American adults ages 18 and older said that they read at least one book in the past year. Almost seven in ten adults (69%) read a book in print in the past 12 months, while 28% read an e-book, and 14% listened to an audiobook.
Reading snapshot
mong all American adults 18 and older, the % who read at least one book in the following formats in the past year
 Total Print E-book Audiobook otal(All adults 18+) 14% 28% 69% 76% a 23 14 64Male 69 a a a bFemale 82 74 33 15 yticihnete/acRc c aWhite 76 29 14 71 c c c bBlack 81 75 30 19 cHispanic 67 56 16 14 ge groupcd a 37 7318-29 79 15 d b30-49 75 66 32 16 d c50-64 77 27 71 16 d 6665+ 70 12 10 Education levela 14 10 57 64High school grad or less a a a a b 32 15 83 78Some college a a ab a c 45 21 78 88College graduate Household incomea 63 14 12< $30,000 68 a b 16 28 70$30,000-$49,999 75 a a ab c$50,000-$74,999 85 19 78 42 a a ab d 74$75,000+ 83 14 46 Community typec aUrban 77 71 29 15 c b 67 31 14Suburban 75 cRural 76 72 18 14 a Note: Columns marked with a superscript letter ( ) or another letter indicate a statistically significant difference between that row and the row designated by that superscript letter. Statistical significance is determined inside the specific section covering each demog raphic trait. Source: Pew ResearchCenter’s Internet Project Omnibus Survey, January 2-5, 2014. N= 1005 American adults ages 18 and older. Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English and Spanish. PEW RESEARCH CENTER
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7 PEW RESEARCH CENTER
Women are more likely than men to have read a book in the previous 12 months, and those with higher levels of income and education are more likely to have done so as well. In addition, blacks are more likely to have read a book than Hispanics. There were no significant differences by age group for rates of reading overall.
In terms of book format, women are more likely than men to have read a print book or an e-book, as are whites and blacks compared with Hispanics and those with Almost half of readers under 30 read an e-book in higher education and incomes the past year compared with others. Younger mong those in each age group who read at least one book in the past adults are also more likely than year, the % who read an e-book during that time those ages 65 and older to have Dec 2011 Nov 2012 Jan 2014 read e-books, as are those who live 60 in urban and suburban areas compared with rural residents. 4047 4142 Finally, adults with higher levels of 35 31 education are more likely to have20 25 25 23 20 19 read audiobooks than those who17 12 did not attend college. 0 18-29 30-49 50-64 65+ Some of these differences are even Source: Pew Research Center surveys, Dec 2011-January 2014. Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English and Spanish. more pronounced if we narrow the PEW RESEARCH CENTER focus to look only at those who read a book in the past year. Among these recent readers, young adults caught up to those in their thirties and forties in terms of overall e-reading: Almost half (47%) of those under 30 read an e-book in 2013, as did 42% of those ages 30-49. E-reading also rose among readers ages 50-64, from 23% in November 2012 to 35% in January 2014. However, the e-reading rate among readers ages 65 and older remains around 17%.
Though e-rising in popularity, print remains the foundation of Americans’ readingbooks are habits: Among adults who read at least one book in the past year, just 5% said they read an e-book in the last year without also reading a print book.
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8 PEW RESEARCH CENTER
In general, the vast majority of those who read e-books and audiobooks also read print books. Of the three (overlapping) groups, audiobook listeners have the most diverse reading habits, while relatively fewer print readers consume books in other formats: 87% of e-book readers also read a print book in the past 12 months, and 29% listened to an audiobook.a print book in the past year, and 56% also read an e-84% of audiobook listeners also read book. format, although 35% of print book readers alsoA majority of print readers read only in that read an e-book and 17% listened to an audiobook. Overall, about half (52%) of readers only read a print book, 4% only read an e-book, and just 2% only listened to an audiobook. Nine percent of readers said they read books in all three formats. Among all American adults, the average (mean) number of books read or listened to in the past year is 12 and the median (midpoint) number is 5half of adults read more than 5in other words, 3 4 books and half read fewer. Neither number is significantly different from previous years.
3 Though the mean represents the average number of books read, this number can be skewed by a relatively small number of very avid readers; this is why it is so much higher than the median, which shows the midpoint number of books read and therefore i s a better measureof what the “typical” American’s reading habits look like.4 Among only adults who did read a book in the past year, the mean is 16 books and the median is 7.
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e typical American read five books in the last 12 months
mong all American adults ages 18+ (including non-readers), the mean (average) and median (midpoint) number read by each group
 otal(All adults 18+) x aMale
bFemale itichnete/acRyaWhite bBlack cHianspic ge groupa18-29 b30-49 c50-64 d65+ Education levelaHigh school grad or less bSome college cCollege graduate Household income aLess than $30,000 per year b$30,000-$49,999 per year c$50,000-$74,999 per year d$75,000 or more per year Community typeaUrban bSuburban cRural
Mean 12 10 a 14 c 13 c 12 7 9 13 13 12 9 a 13 a 16 9 10 ab 18 ab 16 13 12 14
Median 5 4 6
5 4 3
5 5 5 4
3 5 8 3 5 6 8 5 5 5
Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet Project OmnibusSurvey, January 2-5, 2014. N= 1005 American adults ages 18 and older. Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English and Spanish. PEW RESEARCH CENTER
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10 PEW RESEARCH CENTER
In 2011when fewer adults owned e-readers or tablets, many e-book readers accessed their e-books on the devices they did own: their computers or cell phones. The relative popularity of personal computers compared with newer e-reading devices meant that as many e-book readers 5 did their reading on desktops and laptops as on e-readers like Kindles or Nooks. Younger e-book readers were especially likely to access e-books on cell phones or computers, while older adults were more likely to use dedicated e-readers. Only 23% of e-book readers overall read on a tablet.
However, as tablet and e-reader ownership levels have risen over the past few years, these devices have become more prominent in the e-reading landscape. A majority of e-book readers say they read e-books on an e-reader or tablet, and fewer do any e-book reading on a desktop or laptop As tablet ownership grows, more use computer. About a third (32%) of e-book them for e-books readers still say they sometimes read e-books mong all e-book readers ages 18 and older, the % who read e-books on each device on their cell phone, reflecting both the ubiquity of mobile phones and the convenience of these 2011 2014 phones as supplementary reading devices.60 57 55 Though personal computers and cell phones40 42 41 may be used for a wide array of activities 32 29 28 20 (including but not necessarily e-reading), most 23 people who read e-books and own a tablet or e-0 reader consume e-books on those devices. E-E-reader Tablet Computer Cell phone book readers who own dedicated e-reading Source: Pew Research Center surveys, Dec 2011-January 2014. devices also tend to read e-books on them more Interviews were conducted on landlines and cell phones, in English frequently, while computers or cell phones are and Spanish. PEW RESEARCH CENTER used less often, if ever.
Tablet computers
As noted earlier, 42% of adults own a tablet. Most e-book readers who own tablets say they read e-books on that device (78%), with 44% saying they do so at least weekly. Male e-book readers who own tablets are more likely than women to read e-books on these devices (88% vs 72%).
5 http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2012/04/20/e -books-arent-just-for-e-readers-a-deep-dive-into-the-data/Note: These figures are based on Americans ages 16 and older,; the data cited in this report includes only American adults ages 18 and older.
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