The first book of the Hitopadesa ; containing the Sanskrit text with interlinear transliteration, grammatical analysis, and English translation
116 Pages
English

The first book of the Hitopadesa ; containing the Sanskrit text with interlinear transliteration, grammatical analysis, and English translation

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MAX MULLER'SHANDBOOKSFORTHE STUDY OF SANSKRITTHE HITOPADESA.BOOK I.rHURPROBSTHAIN,antal Bookseller,Tin-:FIEST BOOK OF THE HITOPADESA:CONTAININGTHE SANSKRIT TEXT,INTERLINEAR GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS,TRANSLITERATION,AND ENGLISH TRANSLATION.SECOND EDITIONLONDONAND CO.LONGMANS, GREEN,1884.M-\2,1PREFACE.A SERIES of Handbooks for the of Sanskrit seems to be atstudy requiredthe moment two classes of readers those as candidatespresent ;by by who,for the Indian Civil are anxious to that amount ofService, acquire familiaritywith the and literature of the classical of which isgrammar language India,not useful for an honourable at the butonly acquitment public examinations,serves as the best foundation for the of the vernacu-subsequent study spokenlars and that number of; scholars who wish to anby steadily increasing gainof a which is the to theelementary, yet accurate, knowledge language keysecrets of Comparative Philology.There no lack of books inis, for those who makeindeed, EnglishSanskrit the of their life and even continental scholars who wish tostudy ;a sound aud of the ancient and litera-acquire profound knowledge languageture of must still have recourse to the masterworks ofIndia, scholarsEnglishsuch as and Wilson. The first volume of Colebrooke'sColebrooke, Prinsep,Sanskrit is a monument ofGrammar, published sixty years ago, Englishwhich has never beenscholarship surpassed subsequent Grammar,by anywhether in or French. Professor ...

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MAX MULLER'S HANDBOOKS FOR THE STUDY OF SANSKRIT THE HITOPADESA. BOOK I. rHURPROBSTHAIN, antal Bookseller, Tin-: FIEST BOOK OF THE HITOPADESA: CONTAINING THE SANSKRIT TEXT, INTERLINEAR GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS,TRANSLITERATION, AND ENGLISH TRANSLATION. SECOND EDITION LONDON AND CO.LONGMANS, GREEN, 1884. M-\2,1 PREFACE. A SERIES of Handbooks for the of Sanskrit seems to be atstudy required the moment two classes of readers those as candidatespresent ;by by who, for the Indian Civil are anxious to that amount ofService, acquire familiarity with the and literature of the classical of which isgrammar language India, not useful for an honourable at the butonly acquitment public examinations, serves as the best foundation for the of the vernacu-subsequent study spoken lars and that number of; scholars who wish to anby steadily increasing gain of a which is the to theelementary, yet accurate, knowledge language key secrets of Comparative Philology. There no lack of books inis, for those who makeindeed, English Sanskrit the of their life and even continental scholars who wish tostudy ; a sound aud of the ancient and litera-acquire profound knowledge language ture of must still have recourse to the masterworks ofIndia, scholarsEnglish such as and Wilson. The first volume of Colebrooke'sColebrooke, Prinsep, Sanskrit is a monument ofGrammar, published sixty years ago, English which has never beenscholarship surpassed subsequent Grammar,by any whether in or French. Professor SanskritEnglish, German, Benfey's large at in is the work that rivals it inGrammar, published 1852,Leipzig only and authoritativeness.* The of tocomprehensiveness Dictionary Wilson, which is due the which Sanskrit has mademainly rapid progress scholarship in the Universities of is thesaurus of thestill theEurope, only complete of theancient India. There are the editioneslanguage principes, original the due to the honest of suchtranslations, comprehensive essays, industry men as Sir W. and whichJones, Wilkins, Colebrooke, Wilson, Ballantyne, will their of honour in the of student ofalways library everykeep place Sanskrit. scholars whileBut these works are available to advanced only, the books now accessible to students who wish toelementary English begin the of and in have to it without thestudy Sanskrit, who, many cases, begin of a rare edited in such a manner thatwithhelp master, are, exceptions, they fail in retard thethe elements of and progressvery grammar, unnecessarily with someeven of the most It has been said, indeed,painstaking pupils. athat the race of Sanskrit scholars seemed for timeapparent truth, bonafide of Mr. J. Muir ofextinct in but the late; Edinburgh,England publications that in Sanskritand Professor E. B. Cowell of bear witnessCalcutta, with thewill hold her andown, that,scholarship, too, England always * 'The same author has a Practical Grammar of the Sanskrit Languagelately published for the Use of 1863.Students,' London,early a vi ( ) the Civilthe members of Service in there willadvantages enjoyed by India, never be successors of Colebrooke and Wilson men whowanting worthy have not mastered the intricacies of Sanskrit but who aregrammar,only and towards ofof Sanskrit theMSS., contributingcapable reading progress have neverSanskrit texts that been edited andscholarship by editing before, texts that have never been translated before.translating of handbooks is intended to anThe seriespresent elementary comprise Grammar for astudents,elementary English Sanskrit-English Dictionary, the the the Laws of the ofand ordinary text-books, Hitopadesa, Manu, play and such other works as hereafter seem to be calledthe&akuntal, Nala, may A Manual offor either in or in India.England Comparative Philology, written with reference to Greek and is likewise inLatin,special preparation. of several eminent Sanskrit scholars has been secured.The cooperation theThe first volume of First Book of the Hitopades"a,the^erie^contains a work since the of Sir William has been used as the text-Jones,which, days in all and Public Examinations. The Sanskrit text has been sobook Colleges that even those who are not able to command the assistance of anarranged will be able themselves to and translateefficient teacher by read, parse, every of Indian fables.word of this ancient collection The first line contains the Sanskrit text in thewordsletters,Devanagari to the rules of Sandhi.joined accordingproperly second line word transcribed in Roman letters. TheThe gives every ofof transliteration is that Sir W. with a few modificationsJones,system which are now Sanskrit scholars. The words aregenerally adopted by and the final and initial letters allowed to remain unaffected thebyseparated^ rules of words have been and the wordsSandhi. Compound divided, single into are in their Thus sarii-which enter crude forms.composition given but becauseskritoktishu is notsamskrita-uhtishu, sam-krita-uktishu,printed it is as a that enters into with uhti.samskrita, ready-made word, composition on the is divided into thus theSamskaras, contrary, sam-karas, showing that the insertion of the and the ofm into are thereader s, change Anusvara, of the karas with to the sameresult of sam. systemcomposition According samunnatim is asprinted sam-ud-natim, rajaputras appears rajan-putras, as &c. Two are thus secured : the isupaiti upa-eti, advantages pupil warned the text too the aid ofagainst reading mechanically byDevanagari attracted to the rulesthe and his attention is from the firsttransliteration, which the of words.govern composition The third line contains a of word. Thegrammatical every spaceanalysis be for it was to usethat could thisspared limited,being very necessary a end of thelist of which will be found at theabbreviations, complete preface. far asThe fourth line an interlinear translation. Assupplies English each Sanskrit word is here rendered an the suc-word,by Englishpossible of words in Sanskrit incession English. Anybeing preserved throughout idiomwas out theat of the it is that,; byattempt English question yet hoped veniaof the this transvocabulationhelp grammatical analysis, English (sit be and useful to a student.verbo) may intelligible diligent From 38 the transliteration is The afterdiscontinued. studeTic,page having worked his the first to be sufficientlyway through thirty-eight pages, ought familiarised with the to be able to henceforthDevanagari alphabet dispense