The Mide

The Mide'wiwin or "Grand Medicine Society" of the Ojibwa: Seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1885-1886, Government Printing Office, Washington, 1891, pages 143-300

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Mide'wiwin or "Grand Medicine Society"of the Ojibwa, by Walter James HoffmanThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: The Mide'wiwin or "Grand Medicine Society" of the Ojibwa Seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1885-1886, Government Printing Office, Washington, 1891, pages 143-300Author: Walter James HoffmanRelease Date: September 25, 2006 [EBook #19368]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: UTF-8*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GRAND MEDICINE SOCIETY ***Produced by Louise Hope, Carlo Traverso, and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (Thisfile was produced from images generously made availableby the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF/Gallica) athttp://gallica.bnf.fr, with additional images fromhttp://www.1st-hand-history.org/) [Transcriber’s Note: This e-text includes a few characters that can only be viewed with utf-8 (unicode) encoding: ā ē ī ō ū : vowel with macron (“long” mark) ă ĕ ĭ ŏ ŭ : vowel with breve (“short” mark) ⁿ : small raised n If these characters do not display properly--in particular, if the diacritic does not appear directly above the letter--or if ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Mide'wiwin or "Grand Medicine Society" of the Ojibwa, by Walter James Hoffman This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: The Mide'wiwin or "Grand Medicine Society" of the Ojibwa Seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, 1885-1886, Government Printing Office, Washington, 1891, pages 143-300 Author: Walter James Hoffman Release Date: September 25, 2006 [EBook #19368] Language: English Character set encoding: UTF-8 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GRAND MEDICINE SOCIETY *** Produced by Louise Hope, Carlo Traverso, and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF/Gallica) at http://gallica.bnf.fr, with additional images from http://www.1st-hand-history.org/) [Transcriber’s Note: This e-text includes a few characters that can only be viewed with utf-8 (unicode) encoding: ā ē ī ō ū : vowel with macron (“long” mark) ă ĕ ĭ ŏ ŭ : vowel with breve (“short” mark) ⁿ : small raised n If these characters do not display properly--in particular, if the diacritic does not appear directly above the letter--or if the quotation marks in this paragraph appear as garbage, you may need to change your text reader’s “file encoding” or “character set”, or use a different font. Note that the accent marks, as in “Midē´wiwin,” are _not_ meant to display on top of any letter. As a last resort, use the ascii-7 version of this file instead. The music is available in two forms, collected in the “files” directory associated with the .html version of this text. --simplified lilypond files (extension .ly), with lyrics and dynamic markings omitted. --MIDI (playable sound) files for each song. Each [Music] tag includes a page number for cross-reference. Variant spellings and typographical errors are listed at the end of the text. Bracketed passages other than footnotes or illustration tags are in the original.] * * * * * THE MIDĒ´WIWIN OR “GRAND MEDICINE SOCIETY” of THE OJIBWA. by W. J. HOFFMAN. * * * * * CONTENTS. Page Introduction 149 Shamans 156 Midē´wiwin 164 Midē´wigân 187 First degree 189 Preparatory instruction 189 Midē´ therapeutics 197 Imploration for clear weather 207 Initiation of candidate 210 Descriptive notes 220 Second degree 224 Preparation of candidate 224 Initiation of candidate 231 Descriptive notes 236 Third degree 240 Preparation of candidate 241 Initiation of candidate 243 Descriptive notes 251 Fourth degree 255 Preparation of candidate 257 Initiation of candidate 258 Descriptive notes 274 Dzhibai´ Midē´wigân 278 Initiation by substitution 281 Supplementary notes 286 Pictography 286 Music 289 Dress and ornaments 298 Future of the society 299 ILLUSTRATIONS. [Plates and Figures were numbered continuously within each Bureau of Ethnology volume, so there is no Plate I in this article.] Page Plate II. Map showing present distribution of Ojibwa 150 III. Red Lake and Leech Lake records 166 IV. Sikas´sige’s record 170 V. Origin of Âníshinâ´bēg 172 VI. Facial decoration 174 VII. Facial decoration 178 VIII. Ojibwa’s record 182 IX. Mnemonic songs 193 X. Mnemonic songs 202 XI. Sacred objects 220 XII. Invitation sticks 236 XIII. Mnemonic songs 238 XIV. Mnemonic songs 288 XV. Sacred posts 240 XVI. Mnemonic songs 244 XVII. Mnemonic songs 266 XVIII. Jĕs´sakkīd´ removing disease 278 XIX. Birch-bark records 286 XX. Sacred bark scroll and contents 288 XXI. Midē´ relics from Leech Lake 390 XXII. Mnemonic songs 392 XXIII. Midē´ dancing garters 298 Fig. 1. Herbalist preparing medicine and treating patient 159 2. Sikas´sigĕ’s combined charts, showing descent of Mī´nabō´zho 174 3. Origin of ginseng 175 4. Peep-hole post 178 5. Migration of Âníshinâ´bēg 179 6. Birch-bark record, from White Earth 185 7. Birch-bark record, from Bed Lake 186 8. Birch-bark record, from Red Lake 186 9. Eshgibō´ga 187 10. Diagram of Midē´wigân of the first degree 188 11. Interior of Midē´wigân 188 12. Ojibwa drums 190 13. Midē´ rattle 191 14. Midē´ rattle 191 15. Shooting the Mīgis 192 16. Wooden beads 205 17. Wooden effigy 205 18. Wooden effigy 205 19. Hawk-leg fetish 220 20. Hunter’s medicine 222 21. Hunter’s medicine 222 22. Wâbĕnō´ drum 223 23. Diagram of Midē´wigân of the second degree 224 24. Midē´ destroying an enemy 238 25. Diagram of Midē´wigân of the third degree 240 26. Jĕs´sakkân´, or juggler’s lodge 252 27. Jĕs´sakkân´, or juggler’s lodge 252 28. Jĕs´sakkân´, or juggler’s lodge 252 29. Jĕs´sakkân´, or juggler’s lodge 252 30. Jĕs´sakkân´, or juggler’s lodge 252 31. Jĕs´sakkīd´ curing woman 255 32. Jĕs´sakkīd´ curing man 255 33. Diagram of Midē´wigân of the fourth degree 255 34. General view of Midē´wigân 256 35. Indian diagram of ghost lodge 279 36. Leech Lake Midē´ song 295 37. Leech Lake Midē´ song 296 38. Leech Lake Midē´ song 297 39. Leech Lake Midē´ song 297 THE MIDĒ´WIWIN OR “GRAND MEDICINE SOCIETY” OF THE OJIBWAY. By W. J. Hoffman. INTRODUCTION. The Ojibwa is one of the largest tribes of the United States, and it is scattered over a considerable area, from the Province of Ontario, on the east, to the Red River of the North, on the west, and from Manitoba southward through the States of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan. This tribe is, strictly speaking, a timber people, and in its westward migration or dispersion has never passed beyond the limit of the timber growth which so remarkably divides the State of Minnesota into two parts possessing distinct physical features. The western portion of this State is a gently undulating prairie which sweeps away to the Rocky Mountains, while the eastern portion is heavily timbered. The dividing line, at or near the meridian of 95° 50' west longitude, extends due north and south, and at a point about 75 miles south of the northern boundary the timber line trends toward the northwest, crossing the State line, 49° north latitude, at about 97° 10' west longitude. Minnesota contains many thousand lakes of various sizes, some of which are connected by fine water courses, while others are entirely isolated. The wooded country is undulating, the elevated portions being covered chiefly with pine, fir, spruce, and other coniferous trees, and the lowest depressions being occupied by lakes, ponds, or marshes, around which occur the tamarack, willow, and other trees which thrive in moist ground, while the regions between these extremes are covered with oak, poplar, ash, birch, maple, and many other varieties of trees and shrubs. Wild fowl, game, and fish are still abundant, and until recently have furnished to the Indians the chief source of subsistence. Tribal organization according to the totemic system is practically broken up, as the Indians are generally located upon or near the several reservations set apart for them by the General Government, where they have been under more or less restraint by the United States Indian agents and the missionaries. Representatives