New African Woman du 21-11-2018

New African Woman du 21-11-2018

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Published 21 November 2018
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PostCNN IshaSesay Invites us into her new world
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An IC Publication | Issue 45
OP INERVIEWS Oby Ezekwesili Bogolo Joy Kenewendo Isabel dos Sanos Chileshe Kapwepwe …and many more + HO ISSUE Where is Africa’s #MeToo movement? I1PS F0OR HEALHY HAIR …which actually work
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Editor’sPICKS
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HOME’S DESIRES P.104
FASHION CRUSH P.86
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T O S U B S C R I B E T O D AYG O T ON AW M A G A Z I N E .C O M / S U B S C R I B E
F I N D U S O N
WO M E N I N L E A D E R S H I P
1 6Oby Esekwesili  Ready to redeîne Nigerian politics
2 2Vanessa Moungar  Time to unleash the incredible potential of African women
2 4Chileshe Kapwepwe  A new vision for COMESA
3 0are women How fairing in decision-making and leadership?
3 4Bogolo Joy Kenewendo  Botswana’s young rising star of politics
3 8Biolo Alabi, Nigeria ‘We need leaders that can inuence societies in and out of the C-Suite’
4 1Christa Elise Sanders-Bobtoya Promoting a global approach to education
C O N T E N T S I S S U E4 5
8 O N T H E C OV E R Isha Sesay Life after CNN
‘We can choose o sop being willing players in he sexual objecificaion of women in he media’
4 2Dr Rasha Kelej Merck Foundation CEO says no to female infertility stigma
WO M E N I N B U S I N E S S
4 4Carole Kariuki, Kenya  ‘Society is structured and oriented to support men’
4 6Mona Zulficar, Egypt  ‘You lead by example – doing a good job is a driver of change’
4 8to success Obstacles as a woman in business
5 0equality Gender principles in the world of technology
5 2‘angry black The woman’ stereotype and the corporate world
5 4Isabel Dos Santos, Angola  ‘Your best business bet is you! Your skills, motivation and passion’
N AW M A G A Z I N E . C O M
H OT I S S U E
5 8forgotten Africa’s #MeToo moment
6 2daddies and Sugar the tragic ‘sponsor’ syndrome
R E A L L I F E
6 4 Is social media really social?
FA S H I O N
6 8FASHIONOMICS  Strenghtening Africa’s creative industries
7 0Fashion Business In Africa Designers speak
7 6Model Spotlight  Aiden Curtiss: Like mother, like daughter
8 0 2018 Fashion looks we loved
8 4fashion trend Top of the year
8 6future is bright The
H A I R & B E AU T Y
8 8Hair & Beauty 6 trends to try in 2019
9 4 10 tips for healthy hair... which actually work!
LUXU RY I N A F R I CA
9 6living Luxury gathers pace
H E A LT H & L I F E ST Y L E
1 0 05 timesavers for a healthier you
1 0 23 style tips for mindfulness in your home
1 0 4Home Chic Home: Sleek & Sweet
This issue was made possible thanks to our loyal advertisers and with the kind support of the UN Economic Commission for Africa. Through our digital and print platforms as well as our forums we are determined to continue bringing to the fore the case for women in Africa.
Follow me @GinaJaneJere Editor’sNOTE
CONEN IS QUEEN
hereis something special about this issue – our last of what has been a very unsettling 2018. We are at perhaps T one of the most uncertain times in recent history. From climate change to terrorism and violence against women, from health and wellbeing to human rights, everything seems frighteningly volatile. And as usual, women and children are bearing the brunt. Our readers and fans – welcome to our 45th issue, which is also our 10th anniversary edition. What a journey it has been and thank you all for your unwavering support. Not only is this a truly special edition, it also sets the tone of the new directionNew African Womanis embarking on as we become a biannual publication. Needless to say, we live in a world of fast-paced social media “stories”, which by nature and purpose lack depth and analysis. Our new direction therefore screams: Content is Queen! And we are notching our content up a gear or three – veering more to content-led than visual-led stories, that capture the true essence of the current women’s narratives which cannot be articulated in 140 characters or a one-minute video clip, let alone a photo. Most of our ardent readers know and can recite our
mantra by now:to inspire rather than impose; to expertly advise rather than dictate; to tastefully portray our diverse beauty, rather than cheapen it.Ten years on, this ethos still drives our editorial line. We are privileged in this edition to interview some of the most powerful women shaping the narrative in Africa and its diaspora – starting with the fearlessly articulate former CNN favourite, Isha Sesay, our Cover star. Like all the other powerful women featured in this edition, she minces no words on the status of women and girls in this so-called #MeToo, #TimeIsUp era – a movement that is deafeningly taciturn in Africa. Isha is on point when she says: “The reason why the #MeToo movement was able to break in the US is because women who had more economic power were able to come out and break the silence… In Africa most women do not speak out because again it comes down to their economic disempowerment.” Even as we celebrate the small gains made in having more women in positions of power, African women still largely remain marginalised and disempowered. There is still miles of ground to be covered before we can say #WeToo are empowered and free from marginalisation in all its forms. As you reect on our content, may the New Year truly be the one you aspire to have.
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N A W |T H E C O V E RO N
ISHA SESAY ‘We can choose o sop being willing players in he sexual objecificaion of women in he media’
For over a decade, she was he admired African female face in broadcas journalism as news anchor and reporer a CNN. Amid much speculaion and hullabaloo, Isha Sesay qui ha job las July. She sa down wih our edior o se he record sraigh and discuss he deeper reasons why she chose o move on. Wha is in sore for he much-respeced Sierra Leonean journalis? Will she be following in he fooseps of her poliician moher?
Inerview by reGina Jane Jere PhoographyEniko SzucsSylingArnold MilforHair & MakeupVicor Noble
NAW: here has been a lo of speculaion abou your depar-ure from CNN Was he emphasis on Donald rump he real rigger or was here more as o why you lef he pos ha had made you a household name and one of he mos admired broadcas journal-iss ou of Africa? ISHA SESAY: It was one of the rea-sons yes. But there were many interwo-ven factors that made me decide to call it a day. I had been with CNN for an incredible 13 years. And I am grate-ful for the opportunity, the places I visited and the people I met. But after
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13 years, it started to feel like just a job and just routine. Eventually I was in a place which I didn’t particularly like – more so when there was so much of this focus and over-emphasis on Don-ald Trump. I am not saying that he doesn’t de-serve scrutiny or coverage. My prob-lem is that he doesn’t deserve coverage that excludes coverage of everything else happening in the world. That was my issue. I found it increasingly diïcult night after night and it’s about what Trump has put in a tweet, ignoring what was happening in Yemen, Syria or DR-
Congo. When catastrophic events were taking place in the world, they were somehow minimised or some-times completely ignored. It just did not sit well with me. I had moved from England to America 13 years ago because at the time CNN was truly global. I packed my two suitcases back then because I wanted to be part of that. While I have immense respect for my col-leagues and my bosses at CNN, and it was a very hard decision, there was something in my conscience that did not sit well and I had to make this de-cision to leave.
N A W
 W O M E N I N L E A D E R S H I P | N A W
Black embroidered op wih puff sleeves Khosla Jani Couure Black denimSeven Jeans
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Wha lessons did you learn over hose long years a CNN, because you became such an iconic face and many black girls (and boys) looked up o you as a symbol of success in he male-dominaed if no whie-washed wesern me-dia Wha advice do you have for hem? Like many other things in life, the les-sons I learnt are both about the good and the bad. This is not an indict-ment of CNN, but one of the lessons I learnt is that in any news organisation, especially when it comes to a large cor-poration like this, the news is set by a small number of people who when it comes down to it, înally decide what makes it to the screen, what makes it to the page. I think eventually it becomes hard to reconcile with that in align-ment with the stories you want to tell. I would also like to say that with the democratisation of the media these days, through social media, everyone and anyone is able to kind of take to the page or be able to broadcast. This is an interesting thing to take note of, and there is no reason why in a big media organisation a small number of people should be deciding the news agenda. These people should take advan-tage of the new landscape, because anyone can set out, record and be an observer of what they actually see in the world. I don’t mean everyone is or should be a journalist, not at all. What I am saying is, we live in interesting times where the power does not solely lie with the big organisations or publica-tions. A one man or woman citizen journalist can also play an important role in shaping the news today. I therefore personally thought my agenda and role as a journalist at CNN was not in alignment with where the network is at the moment, and I had to do something about it. I stopped en-joying what I used to do and did not want to do it anymore.
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Sriped blazerINC Leaher uxedo sriped joggerINC Suede bow pump Aminah Abdul Jillil
O N T H E C O V E R | N A W
T H E R E A S O N W H Y T H E # M E T O O M O V E M E N T W A S A B L E T O B R E A K I N T H E U S I S B E C A U S E W O M E N W H O H A D M O R E E C O N O M I C P O W E R W E R E A B L E T O C O M E O U T A N D B R E A K T H E S I L E N C E
But again, you asked about other triggers. One other is that my mother has been unwell ever since she had a stroke in 2016, and that was also part of my decision to no longer be at the network.
You were once he face ofInside Africaa CNN And you have men-ioned he need for balanced re-poring, and he imporance of ciizen journalism We all know how CNN and oher wesern me-dia conexualise African news Having been in ha errain and now moving on o he nex chaper of your career, how do you advise we cover Africa as African media ourselves? How will you now be elling he African sory? First of all, most African media are owned by global or corporate organisa-tions or are state-owned, which sells us short. But I would like to see more Af-rican publications and news networks – print or digital – put more money, re-sources and more training into African journalism. It would be good to see this investment infused into all these struc-tures and for journalists to be trained and paid fairly. Investment can help eliminate journalists from being manip-ulated in certain countries. I would also like to see more depth and breadth in our story-telling as African journalists.
N A W
I may be good o injec inves-men ino African journalism; however, here is also he saying, “He who pays he piper calls he une” In ha case, are we sill in danger of losing he African narra-ive? Should African governmens be invesing in African journalism, oo? When you look at big publications such as theWashington Post orNew York Times, they are owned by wealthy families or the private sector. So I don’t really think in the African context, we should make it incumbent on govern-ments to put money into journalism. How many countries in the world do that? Look at the BBC in the UK. What I would like to see is for Af-rican governments to create environ-ments that allow media to operate freely without fear or interference. But we ultimately need to have private in-vestment coming in. But again it brings me back to what I talked about earlier – the democrati-sation of the media through technolo-gy and social media, which has opened up the space and made audiences less reliant on the big names. I am amazed by the stories that I read and see on social media – from Ghana, Sierra Le-one, Botswana, etc. It’s a remarkable landscape and what I would like to see is money put into it so that Africa
can professionalise and monetise, and promote this space. We need to do that and that way we will own our African story.
You are coming back home so o speak, having enjoyed a press journey where you could repor freely wihou repercussions he same canno be said in some pars of Africa where press freedom is sill limied and as we speak here are counries who are limiing so-cial media access I’s sill a all or-der isn’ i? Which is a shame, because on one hand we hear all the time, “Africa is open for Business”, while at the same time the same governments are sup-pressing their own domestic press. It’s all wrongheaded and it is also a sign of our African governments’ democratic immaturity. I am still trying to under-stand why such a basic norm should still be an issue and be so diïcult to take root in this century. The thing about African leaders and all the concerns they have that press freedom will open them up to criticism, they have to know that press freedom also opens them up to praise where praise is due and where they are doing good things. At the same time, they need to be called to account. For me it doesn’t matter that Africa’s growth economi-cally is 3.7 or 5 per cent. What is that growth if it is not inclusive growth, what is that growth if the quality of life of the majority of African people is still basic and some people don’t even have their basic freedoms? I înd it deeply frustrating.
So wha is an Isha Sesay’s call o acion? I have been very privileged to have had the space and prominence I had the chance to occupy and it gave me this proîle. I think it will be remiss of me not to use the proîle I have to call for greater freedoms of the press, as
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