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Partition complète, Rip Van Winkle, Folk Opera in Three Acts, De Koven, Reginald

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Découvrez les partitions de morceau Rip Van Winkle partition complète, opéras, par De Koven, Reginald , Op. 414. La partition early 20th century célèbre écrite pour les instruments tels que: orchestre, chœur, solistes vocaux
Cette partition se constitue de plusieurs mouvements: 3 Acts et l'on retrouve ce genre de musique classée dans les genres partitions pour orchestre, pour voix et chœur avec orchestre, partitions chœur mixte, opéras, partitions pour voix, pour voix, chœur mixte, orchestre, Stage travaux, langue anglaise
Visualisez en même temps tout un choix de musique pour orchestre, chœur, solistes vocaux sur YouScribe, dans la catégorie Partitions du début des années 20.
Edition: New York: G. Schirmer, 1919. Plate 29096.
Libbretiste: Percy MacKaye (1875-1956)

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Reads 30
Language English
Document size 13 MB

RIP VAN WINKLE
New York G. SCHIRMER BostonVCOPYRIGHT i IDEJJCiN 90 BY O JCMlRMER EOward*' DEDWARD B E VALL RIGHTS OF REPRODUCTION, TRANSLATION
AND PUBLIC PERFORMANCE RESERVED
FOR ALL COUNTRIES, INCLUDING
NORWAY, SWEDEN AND DENMARK
Text Copyright, 1919, by Percy MacKaye
Copyright, 1919, by G. Schirmer
29096Argument
Act I
The action begins about the middle of the eighteenth century on the
village green of a Dutch community in the Catskills.
Here Nicholas Yedder, landlord of the Inn, has two daughters,
Katrina and Peterkee. The elder—Katrina—a buxom but shrewish girl,
is betrothed to Rip Van Winkle, a happy-go-lucky vagabond of the village;
Peterkee, still childa in her early teens, attends the school of Derrick Van
Bummel. whose son a stutteringJan, foolish fellow, desires Katrina's
hand for himself and is favored by Nicholas on account of his property.
The wedding settlement between Katrina and Rip, however, is
ready to be signed, when Derrick enters dragging in Peterkee as a culprit
whom Rip has lured away to play hookie from school with the other
children. Clad in ragged Dutch trousers and carrying a fishpole, Peterkee
admits that, at Rip's instigation, she has been fishing with plumcake for
a mermaid in a mountain brook. At this moment Rip himself appears
with the school children, flying a kite. Absorbed in his play with them,
he has totally forgotten his wedding engagement with Katrina, who
berates him fiercely and leaves him bewildered and crestfallen, while
Peterkee is taken by her father to be punished in the Inn.
A Goose-girl now cheers up Rip, by getting him to join her and the
children in a dance, which is terminated by an approaching thundershower,
as Peterkee—escaped from her father's punishment—hastens to Rip to
be comforted. Listening to the thunder, Rip tells her and the children
the legend of Hendrick Hudson and his Crew, how every twenty years
they return in their ghostly ship, the Half Moon, to hold a bowling party
in the mountains. At the climax of his tale, with a great thunderclap,
Hendrick Hudson himself appears in a sunshine shower. All take flight
but Rip and Peterkee, whom Hendrick invites to his midnight party to
play at ninepins, when he promises to give Rip a magic flask as a wedding
gift. this.At Rip turns exultantly to Katrina. who is reentering, but as
she comes, Hendrick vanishes. Rip tells her of Hendrick's offer, but
Katrina, mocking Rip's credulity, tells him to return with his magic flask
by the morrow's sundown or she will marry Jan. Rip replies
confidently—and Peterkee says she will help him find the flask. The voice
of Hendrick is heard calling, and amidst the storm Rip and Peterkee set
forth together for the mountains.
Act II
(Scene I.) Stopping at Rip's hut after the storm to make
preparations for their journey, Rip and Peterkee continue their way (Scene 2)
by a dusky footpath, up the mountain, attended by fain,' voices of calling
Katydids and the plaintive cry of the Whippoorwill. So they encounterDirck Spuytenduyvil, mate of the Half Moon, carrying two kegs of liquor,
which Rip helps him to carry to the mountain peak.
(Scene There, by moonlight,3.) are gathered Hendrick Hudson
and his ghostly crew, who welcome them to their bowling party, during
which Hendrick and Dirck plot to bring about the future wedding of Rip
to Peterkee, instead of to Katrina, by detaining Rip on the mountain till
their return after twenty years. To this end, Peterkee is allowed to win
the magic flask in a bowling match with Dirck, who then conducts her
down the mountain, saying Rip will follow, while Rip—absorbed and
delighted in his play of lightning and thunder—is plied with a
sleepingpotion, the ninth draught of which overwhelms him with slumber, just
as the golden Half Moon comes sailing into view on the air, manned by
the ghostly sailors, singing him a lullaby of farewell.
Act III
(Scene At1.) sunrise, on the mountain peak, Rip is awakened by
fairy presences of nature, who take flight as he stirs. Rising painfully,
he is bewildered to find himself old, white-bearded and weather-beaten.
Calling on Peterkee, he disappears in the mists, from which now emerge
into view (Scene the ruined2) chimney and walls of Rip's hut, entangled
with vines and shrubbery. Here Peterkee, now a young woman, in
bridal clothes, comes searching for the magic flask. Finding it in the
chimney niche where she left it, she reveals how she tasted its enchanted
waters of youth and prays that Rip, so long lost, may yet return to h's
home. Ancient and strange, Rip himself appears before her like a "fairy
goblin." In their scene together they are on the point of recognition,
when old Nicholas enters, chiding Peterkee for running away from the
wedding at sundown and, despite Rip's protest, hurries her off with him,
leaving Rip to a sadly mystified soliloquy by his ruined hearth.
(Scene But now,3.) on the village green by the Inn, Hans Van
Bummel, younger brother of is aboutJan, to be wedded to Peterkee, who
has stubbornly refused to marry for these twenty years past, during which
Katrina and have rearedJan a large family of their own. Now, as
Nicholas comes with Peterkee, and the ceremony is about to proceed, barking
dogs and hooting children announce the entrance of old Rip, who comes
claiming his promised bride at sundown.
Mocked and struck down as an intruding beggar, he is befriended by
Peterkee, who gives him as alms the magic flask. As Rip puts this to his
lips, lightning and thunder prelude the reappearance of Hendrick Hudson
and his crew, who—to miraculous organ-peals—troop forth in wedding
raiment from the church, as Rip appears in the fairy light restored to his
youth. Rigid as ninepins the aghast Dutch folk are bowled into oblivion,
as Rip and Peterkee are united in their wedding at sundown.CHARACTERSCAST OF
High BaritoneRIP VAN WINKLE
Bass-BaritoneHUDSONHENDRICK
BassDIRCK SPUYTENDUYVIL
BassNICHOLAS YEDDER
BaritoneDERRICK VAN BUMMEL
TenorVAN BUAIMELJAN
MuteVAN BUMMELHANS
Soprano
.PETERKEE VEDDERKATRINA
Mezzo-SopranoGOOSE-GIRL
AND TIMEPLACE
MountainsIn the Catskill
Eighteenth Centurymiddle of theAbout the
SCENES
afternoon)with Inn and Church (lateAct I. A Village Green,
(interior) on the borderFirst: Rip Van Winkle's HutAct II. Scene
evening)Milage and Forest (earlyof the
(moonlight)Path up the MountainScene Second: A Forest
Mountain (midnight and after)Third: The Peak of theScene
III. (Twenty years later)Act
Mountain (dawn)Scene First: The Peak of the
(toward sundown)Rip's Hut (exterior) in ruinsScene Second:
alterationsGreen of Act I, withScene Third: The Village
(sundown)VAN WINKLERIP3
Rip Van Winkle
Folk-Opera in Three Acts
Prelude
Words by Music by
Percy MacKaye Reginald de Koven. Op. 414
Allagro moderate- = 84)J.
Piano
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Copyright, 19i9, by 6. S"hirmer
290864
1°Tempo
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29096—
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29096C
ACT I
Introduction
old-timey scene: a small village green, shaded by anIt is a sleepy, immense elm on the left, a rustic Inn; on the right, a
;
between them— vistas of cloud-fleckedquaintChurch, with porch; mountains and a blue-green river-valley. Near the
a fountain, whereWomen of the village gather to do their washing.church—
baskingOn wooden benches by the Inn old Men sit in the sunshine. Lazily from their long pipes they cloudspuff little
of tobacco smoke.
>.Moderato con moto (J = 88) i
Jr tfi.—
Allegro moderato (J.= 66)
Curtain/T\
<*-fe£4h A—*=MII 3 :B ^S^ «1»i
1°Tempo
./*Cowherd inA the distance (SOP, or TEN.)
Male Chorus (seated on benches)
Allegro agitatoTENORS (spoken)
3=IA
ii *=¥1=E m
Poof, poof, poof, poof, poof, poof,
BASSES (spoken)
»
| Esi * t I >s
Poof, poof, poof, poof, poof,P°°f,
Allegro agitato
J^5 ji32^P ^oeo agitatoH=
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mp tranquillo

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29096IOTemAllegro vivace P°Cowherd
drow- sy foun-tain, All we on fades a - way,dream
29096cresc.
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sc *=£
way, fades a way_ Far up - on the
La la a way.la! Far ^
•,cresc.
a iOilVPTtvp* P )P £/r ffpf
All we dream on fades a - way, now all we dream on fades a - way up - on the
Cowherd (behind scene)
with a sweet(Goose-girl enters singing
Allegro commodo geeseclear switchingher flockofwhitevoice,
willow branch)with a long /T\ kjjJ
29036Andante con moto
Goose-girl
± £ ^^± £ B3^^
- - - - Cloud on the Kaa-ters - kill,Kaa tors kill, Kaa ters- kill.
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e.g. [Pp r rI ^^j i^r^*r p | *r
- gray, green and grayTell me the mor- row's weath er: Green and
jmiOff j p =ipp p
home thewrong- And my lame goose sheWentIs my wil-low tree
(
1°Tempo
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EEE3EEE5E
prolla vocemm
I
2909610
Allegro commodo
Allegro moderato
1stSOPRANOS I. II (Women enter; 4 sing) ntf
<i jtt § i§n
Rib-bul-lee!Men
Rib-bul-lee!
TENORS
-PPuff of cloud from pipe of clay.
BASSES
Puff of cloud from pipe of clay
Allegro moderato (J r 144)Allegro commodo j
menoCowherd (in the distance) P. P°F°
(Next 4 join in) Co',bos!(Other women Co'! Co'! Co'Lcome on)
crese.
Rib-bul-lee, rib-bul-lee; Rub and wring!
A poco meno
* 9& * %& * %X
Andante con moto
Goose-girl
Kaa-ters-kill Kaa-ters-kill Cloud -on the Kaa-ters kill,_
Women PP
Rib-bul-lee! Rib-bul-lee! Rib-bul-lee!
Andante con moto I
29096—
11
mf>
G. vP ? jt
i rip- m(r^ ipg gpjg ppp
Will it be fair or low-er? Sil-ver rings, sil-ver rings
/ PPL
3E -r-a**f P
ib-bul-lee!1 Rib-bul-lee!
Puffof cloud frompipe of clay! puff,
puff!yen
TENORS2>P^V^~rJ- 7 *|j'XyS
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BASSES
fe^l^m =*£
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g*p PI
Puffof fcloud frofrompipe of clay,.
*J|£
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aiiimando cresc.e
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#-£
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2909612
1°Tempo poro ad lib.
5=nxfmf _ mf _
mf
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Like, sun-shine show-er, like a sun-shine show-er.a Kaaterskill,
TENORS i
'
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^p p <p £gf? p
Puff from pipe of clayL
BASSES
f
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Puff from pipe of clay!.
1°Tempo
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sempre dim. e rail.
- 1
^G.G. .Mp j£ ii^
1 1p pjr
- -Kaa-ters-kill! Cloud on the Kaa ters kill!.
Women u i»if
- Rib-bul-lee! Rub andwring!Rib-bul lee!
ValseAllegro moderato, quasi alia
way-fade a -Dreams
b
E/ j} jI
2909613
geese)(The Goose-girl passes off with her
nvp
Jm^ J Mppj1 Ip Hf pn »m-^^
ev-'ry -dam's son andmad - am, King and Queen, And ABut mas-ter and
ffp lip
I Wfhpl f f f?|^7jJ^|^[pp f pg
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iti-^tS i i^
raZZ. molto
E3&
wa - ter To keep them cloth-eddaugh - ter, God clad all and gave them
I7\
con motoAndanteAllegro commodo
off)Goose-girl (sounding softly p
of clay!Puff of cloud from pipe
con motoAndante
Allegro commodo
29096-
14
Allegro agitato <J = 96)
C\poco cresc.
Katrina (within; screams shrilly)
GO.
>ir
! ni Uj"^ uni iB IJ ji
^joco cresc.
g^E
(Banging clatter bursts fromthe Inn, and a pewter plate comes skimming out and falls on ground. Women stop
washing, andjnen take their pipes from their mouths)
for I p 1 p tetPr
Katrina (screams from inside)
Piu moto >;
u
^fei I E #p
No, no, no! No, no, no!
Nicholas
» aIi
Men Van
(With droll shrug of shoulders)
> ^—a — (spoken)(spoKen)fe» p-T*
t —
All we dream on fades a - way. Poof!
2809615
Allegro, quasi presto
(Followed by the screaming voice,Janvan
- nev - er!No; nev - er, nev er,Bum-mel?
H&
iini tlTLJ
\>i
!
7 a ^V 1 f f i^M
to keep a sedate poise in spite of a fierce thrustfat young man,comes stumbling forth from the Inn, tryingBummel, a
AnimandoAllegro pomposo (d = 104)
dullness is livened only by theabout 30, whose general air ofbehind. He is a foolish-faced young man offrom
calls back, stuttering)holds in both hands. Hegarb, by a big red tulip, which hedandified fashion of his and
moderatoAllegro
2909616
<JAllegretto con moto : 126)
-Jan -^ ^
*A
7m^PMMIMMM 1
- -Bu-but, bu-but, Ka Ka-Ka-Ka-Ka- Ka-Ka tri - na!
&
* Mf=^ter
m isp#£
%d.
buxom, apple-cheeked(A young woman appears in the doorway and stands mocking him)
2909617
dressed as a typical Dutch landlord. He carriesappears a dour-eyed man of about 50,(Behind her
papers, quills, ink, and a big book)various legal
Katrina« / >A
p ->ph n|m 1 i i^jj | ! j Hi1 |j gji no- thing!your nod- die- No-said all you have got inYou
Nicholas^ (sternly)
/T\
Eai >as
£
Kag fe &*
»LJF§ MW
commodoAllegro P>
7 I
P
Bah!
S
7 7 Ip p i
- tri - na! Beg now Jan'sners! Ka- now now! Your man-tri na,
(J nr,)Allegro commodo z
j ^j-^mJjji i
fie.
fa-ther?Bah to your- Bah!par don!
29096)
18
Allegro moderato
ff^eciso
*m £
irpp r p
mate with that sil - ly bah - sheep there! Not me, Sir!
jan
- -Ka tri na!
Allegretto come prima
*A
K.
Ji* J>i > m i a i ir pp » ^ M'L
Not me, Sir! I've found a hus-band that's more to my
accel.
Andanteu
K. m 3E££
mind!_
Nicholas (laughs grimly) (Turning to the Taverners and Women,
who begin to gather around
EipEi
P P j 5 gggg |Qjj
Ha ha! A hus-band! ha ha!
Andante
ten.
t=^^* •*i<mmfi pffpp
2909619
Allegro moderato (J : 84)
1
'B JX 1 J |M^B p g j p 1| g
- bout? ThatYou her? You know what she's talk-ing ahear
%b. * %a
Nic.
Van Win-kle!the vil-lage, Rip, Ripvag-a -bond, rat-tle-brain rogue of
(
scherzandoAllegro
Katrina f
Me v«» 8
He's mine!Chorus
SOI'RANOS I. II
Rip Van Win - kle!Rip,
TENOR
f -,»*th , ^fe1 ^^^
BASS
Rip Van Win - kle! Allegro scherzandoRip,
2909620
Rip is mine; the - - luck- - - -hap- go i est, Hand som est lad inpy the
. /=_
:U v ^&XK l a }\S fi b j)i pP^P P P n
val - ley of Hud- son! Ka - tri - na Ved - der and Rip Van Win-kle,
te * i
y of f§=^idl
Allegro y/>% ^
')^^F ^ 7 t|J>7 f gjj-J.
-We shall be wed - ded to mor - row at sun - down,
1
-f ? r- i J &4 J)
j-/-vj»JJj^
|l ^axJp j
/
:M*r J"J9 , p , ii "^^«r£_£
Allegro moderato
Cresc. ./;^ "?/
t*=j•> I FS ^ h ^
be? See! There'sYon, in the church! What else would I
Nicholas y
p-s in s^g> r g
So you're cer - tain?
r\Allegro moderato (J z 88
2909621sings, Nicholas turns to the lays the things his hands one by one)(As Katrina table and on it in
Piii moto,gTazioso (<J:92)
J' ^ m^&#frJ £^5J $ J) m P^
- ble, and pa - pers, and goose-quill and ink To sign up the set - tie - ment-Bi
Pl| jl J J J 5 3 5 J J J Jf P
m—a: n•w^ n i i i
s s
JJ ' J >e see fiIS ijm r p p r ?p fr p r
-house, With sty, and cow- barn, and a cres, and yon-derThedow-er and
pigj"jMc J 7i=±m Jnjn
# r r rr *r
=S=,:"-B 3 31 I fm 1J"=r
A
r^v r b p i Mri g pPi
now is theThere on the li-cense,and hour,AndJus-tice of Peace to set his big seal
» j. ? r =f=tk*s mfflm PFmart: nflcgg.J
mm m^fLNU
allarg.
ot|9 roll.^
stands Ka-tri-na, stands Ka-and herethere stands the ta-ble,
Women a a
29096